Lil Wayne’s influence is everywhere, you don’t have to look far at all. No matter who you look at: Migos, Young Thug, Post Malone, Future, Drake, Chance the Rapper, Weezy’s handwriting is all over them.

First take a look at Culture II. Migos certainly have a southern swag that is not easily replicated, but so many of their songs sound just like a Dedication 2 Lil Wayne. Quavo at times sounds like Lil Wayne is writing verses for a young Gucci Mane’s, and it just so happens that he can sing like just like Weezy.

Post Malone’s rap/sung style is a mirror image to joints from Lil Wayne like “How to Love” and “Single.” When you listen to “Notice Me,” the new Migos/Post Malone collab, it sounds like you took a 2011 Lil Wayne song and subbed in Migos and Post.

Young Thug’s Weezy influence is obvious and undeniable, but take his feature on “Havana” just as a super-specific example. It’s 100% reminiscent of the days when Lil Wayne would feature on a pop star’s track and be the only reason someone listened to it. (Although in this one, the song is well worth listening to without Young Thug)

Let’s look at Chance the Rapper for a second. A young, small, high pitched rapper that raps about very random subjects? Hmm…. Who does that sound like to us? When you listen to “No Problems,” you hear a Grammy winning effort that not only features Lil Wayne, but wouldn’t have been possible without him.

How about DJ Khaled’s super-hit “I’m the One”? Of course Bieber has some major pull when it comes to the success of a pop track, but let’s look at the rappers, Quavo, Chance the Rapper, and Lil Wayne. Now we’ve already looked at how Quavo and Chance have been heavily influenced by Weezy, but it’s one thing for these types of rappers to be able to carve out a niche fan base on their own and be successful. However it’s a totally different thing to have a #1 hit bolstered by 3 high-pitched, small, rappers. That’s all that’s on that track. There’s no big deep voiced guy, no super fast rapping spitter, no Drake wanna-be singing, just Lil Wayne and two of his clones.

Again, I want to reenforce this point. I’m not saying that Lil Wayne clones are the only rappers in hip-hop with the previous paragraph. There are plenty of Drake clones and others out there. But when Lil Wayne came on the scene, he made being a small, high-pitched rapper with dreads super cool. Before Weezy, there was no one like that who set the mold. “I’m the One” shows that rap has changed so much now, that a #1 song can be made entirely from rappers who have followed in that mold that Lil Wayne created.

Even the Drake clones get their lineage from Lil Wayne, because let’s face it, when Drake’s not singing his heart out, he’s playing 7 degrees of Kevin Bacon with Weezy’s flows (or getting them from his ghostwriters.) If your favorite rapper is Kendrick or J Cole, guess what, they’re also hugely influenced by Wayne.

Therefore, to conclude boys and girls, this is just another example of how Lil Wayne is the Greatest Rapper of All Time. No matter where you look in today’s hip hop scene, you will see the handprints of Weezy F. As Quavo said in Culture II: “Gotta be like the Carters.” #weezysthegoat